Can reflexology maintain or improve the well-being of people with Parkinson’s Disease?

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Can reflexology maintain or improve the well-being of people with Parkinson's Disease?

Abstract

This study explored whether reflexology could improve or sustain the wellbeing of people with Parkinosn’s Disease [PD] using the PDQ39 wellbeing tool designed specifically for use with people with PD. The treatmnt protocal involved giving 8 therapy sessions to 16 people with varying derees of PD in a cross-over design to enable a longitudinal survey of impact. Whilst the results reflected the progressive nature of PD deterioration over time there was an improvement in wellbeing over the active therapy phase. These results suggest that continuous two- three weekly reflexology may limit further deteroration or maintain improvement of wellbeing. A further study is indicated to study this hypothesis.

Citation:

Johns C, Blake D, Sinclair A. Can reflexology maintain or improve the well-being of people with Parkinson’s Disease? Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2010 May;16(2):96-100. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2009.10.003. Epub 2009 Nov 4. PMID: 20347841.

The conclusion of this research paper in Greek

The purpose of this section is to make this research paper useful to Greek speaking reflexologists. This is a tool developed by the Center of Reflexology and Research (Κέντρο Ρεφλεξολογίας και Έρευνας) in Greece and supervised volunteers from across the world.

Μετάφραση των συμπερασμάτων της συγκεκριμένης έρευνας:

Αυτά τα αποτελέσματα υποδηλώνουν ότι η συνεχής εφαρμογή της ρεφλεξολογίας, δύο ή τρεις φορές την εβδομάδα, μπορεί να περιορίσει την περαιτέρω επιδείνωση ή να διατηρήσει τη βελτίωση της ευεξίας. Περαιτέρω έρευνα ενδείκνυται για τη μελέτη αυτής της υπόθεσης.

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